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Old 16-07-2018, 09:43 AM   #11
MBRuss
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Generally speaking, it varies by manufacturer and often by region, too.

German paints tend to be hard, Japanese paints tend to be very soft, however it's never a definite thing and paints can even vary by manufacturer, so I think some Porsche paints can be quite soft, for example.

The best way is to do a test spot on your car starting with your least aggressive polish and pad combination first, and then work your way up to more aggressive abrasives if required.

Being Japanese, you'll probably find that your paint is quite soft, which is both good and bad. Softer paint mars more easily, so you'll have to be more careful when washing it. However it's also easier to correct when you want to polish it out.

You may find that the finishing polish is enough to correct it even, and that compound isn't required. The only real way is to test on your specific car to see how the paint reacts. Also areas that have been resprayed may be softer than the factory paint, so that's another thing to watch out for, as one panel may be softer than another.

This is why everyone goes on about black Japanese paint as being the worst, because it's easily scratched and shows the scratches the worst of any colour too.

Sometimes the paint can be so soft that a brand new soft microfibre is enough to lightly mar it, which as you can imagine also makes it very difficult to polish out to a high gloss.

You car isn't black, is it?

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Old 16-07-2018, 09:47 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by MBRuss View Post
Generally speaking, it varies by manufacturer and often by region, too.

German paints tend to be hard, Japanese paints tend to be very soft, however it's never a definite thing and paints can even vary by manufacturer, so I think some Porsche paints can be quite soft, for example.
The best way is to do a test spot on your car starting with your least aggressive polish and pad combination first, and then work your way up to more aggressive abrasives if required.

Being Japanese, you'll probably find that your paint is quite soft, which is both good and bad. Softer paint mars more easily, so you'll have to be more careful when washing it. However it's also easier to correct when you want to polish it out.

You may find that the finishing polish is enough to correct it even, and that compound isn't required. The only real way is to test on your specific car to see how the paint reacts. Also areas that have been resprayed may be softer than the factory paint, so that's another thing to watch out for, as one panel may be softer than another.

This is why everyone goes on about black Japanese paint as being the worst, because it's easily scratched and shows the scratches the worst of any colour too.
Sometimes the paint can be so soft that a brand new soft microfibre is enough to lightly mar it, which as you can imagine also makes it very difficult to polish out to a high gloss.

You car isn't black, is it?
Ok great, this is all good to know, at the same time a little scary as I can see how easy it is to get it wrong!
At some point I will look into getting a machine, my old Porsche has ruined me financially so for now it’s just down to good old fashion elbow grease.

My Legacy is white, polar white.

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Old 16-07-2018, 09:51 AM   #13
MBRuss
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That's good then. White is the easiest colour, because it's the hardest to see the scratches on. (However this can also make it hard to polish because you can't see if you've gotten rid of the scratches as easily and then may spot then later after you think you've gotten rid of them all.)

You may want to get some sort of LED torch to use as an inspection light to help you see the scratches.

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