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Old 30-04-2018, 11:59 AM   #271
Mr Whippy
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So how much is an appropriate angled gun for the 1152 tst?

And is it angled parallel or perpendicular to the fan beam? Ie, holding the gun as you would, the end will angle down, then the fan is horizontal, or vertical?

A proper gun with swivel feed would be ideal. Do you do integrated swivels or are they big bulky additional bits like the QR fitments?

I’ve looked on your website but I can’t seem to find much at all that tells me exactly what I’d be buying.
I’m sure I found a full lance yesterday but now I’m the Kranzle site I can’t find it.


Just to be clear, I think the PW and accessories are great value despite the price.

BUT, at this price you also don’t want to compromise on getting suitable attachments. So having a specific attachment for car work is fine by me as that’s the whole reason I bought the 1152TST.

Last edited by Mr Whippy; 30-04-2018 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 01-05-2018, 10:43 AM   #272
Kranzle
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I will get a part number for exactly what I think you are after, in the mean time this is a link to the new 2018 program: https://www.kraenzle.com/en/download...-catalogs.html

Which way would you prefer the nozzle to be, horizontal or vertical? Both options are possible. Usually i would set these up with the bend pointing down to the ground and the nozzle vertical so you are looking down the blade of water rather than through it.

The bend would usually be about 30 degrees as standard.

William
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:38 PM   #273
MBRuss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kranzle View Post
The oil cap/dipstick is installed by hand, not a machine and shouldn’t be over torqued.
I can’t confirm how strong that individual is and weather they have a stronger grip than average, but what I do know from experience is because the cap has an O-ring on the thread, this O-ring often gets caught up in the thread when it’s tightened. If you are familiar with nylon insert nuts, lock nut or elastic stop nuts then you will know how hard it can be to turn a nut even part way down a bare thread with nothing for it to be tight on.
I can screw one of these nuts down with my hand all the way down to the bottom, then try and unscrew it but it feels too tight.

I have seen that YouTube video and it seems rather awkward, using the right hand tools correctly should not destroy the cap or the front cover. You also do not stand the machine upright when checking the oil level.

If the cap is really that tight and you can’t turn it by hand, then I would remove the front cover and use a set of vicegrips / molegrips, you can even use a bit of kitchen paper between the grips and the nut to avoid any little marks.

William
Hi William,

After removing the front cover and using some rubber matting to allow me to better grip the dipstick cap (all with the machine led down) I couldn't budge it one bit. I'm not the strongest guy in the world, but I can only assume that mine was tightened down by a German bodybuilder with iron fists!

The space it's in makes it difficult to get a good grip on it, or even get a tool in there to grab it.

Out of interest, how much is the part, or would you be able to send me one FOC if it's impossible to remove without totalling it?

Kranzle even try to troll us by putting a slot in the top of the cap, but making the plastic so soft that if you go anywhere near it with a screwdriver it just disintegrates.

I'm not convinced that I can grab it with any sort of grips tightly enough to move it without damaging it, even with kitchen roll (which would probably slip against the plastic).

I'll give it a try this weekend... wish me luck.

Oh, also - did you have the part number/best price to buy the oil sight glass, and where does it fit? In the dipstick hole, or somewhere else?

Last edited by MBRuss; 02-05-2018 at 12:48 PM.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:46 PM   #274
MBRuss
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Originally Posted by Kranzle View Post
What you also have to consider is that pressure washers are used for a huge variety of jobs and applications and that it’s difficult to please everyone.
Eg,
The person cleaning a car wants a shorter lance to get around the vehicle next to a house
I can vouch for this. I got the Qwashers kit for my Kranzle and after I finished washing my car I realised I hadn't touched the lance. I used the jet directly in the end of my Suttner gun the whole time. I never found any need for anything longer, even for the roof.

It was a revelation and stops you from accidentally getting too close with the end of the nozzle (which is more easily done when it's a couple of feet away from your hands). It's especially useful around the wheels.
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:09 PM   #275
Kranzle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBRuss View Post
...
Out of interest, how much is the part, or would you be able to send me one FOC if it's impossible to remove without totalling it? ...

...
Oh, also - did you have the part number/best price to buy the oil sight glass, and where does it fit? In the dipstick hole, or somewhere else?
The part number for the oil cap and dipstick is 49009 with a RRP of £4.98 +Vat and postage.

If you have to destroy the cap to remove it then send me your serial number and we will put a claim in for it to get you a new one FOC.

You would lose the dip stick, but you could use the old style oil cap which you use a 22mm socket to remove and replace 43437 £6.85+ Vat and postage.

The oil sight glass is part number 420181 £5.59 +Vat and postage, but the 1152TST does not usually have the hole drilled out where it goes. Once the front cover is fitted the sight glass would be completely covered.

Hopefully you can get the dipstick moving but it does sound like it was a very strong German tightening those up.

William
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:18 PM   #276
MBRuss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kranzle View Post
The part number for the oil cap and dipstick is 49009 with a RRP of £4.98 +Vat and postage.

If you have to destroy the cap to remove it then send me your serial number and we will put a claim in for it to get you a new one FOC.

You would lose the dip stick, but you could use the old style oil cap which you use a 22mm socket to remove and replace 43437 £6.85+ Vat and postage.

The oil sight glass is part number 420181 £5.59 +Vat and postage, but the 1152TST does not usually have the hole drilled out where it goes. Once the front cover is fitted the sight glass would be completely covered.

Hopefully you can get the dipstick moving but it does sound like it was a very strong German tightening those up.

William
Thanks William, I appreciate your help.

Hopefully I'll get some time to look at it this weekend and will try to get some grips in there, however, even with the front cover removed from the machine only around half of the cap is easily accessible, as it's close to other parts on one side, making it hard to get something like mole grips in there, plus the cap is relatively smooth and round, so I suspect the grips may just slip.

Will have a go anyway and let you know how I get on.

Thanks
Russ
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Old 04-06-2018, 01:05 PM   #277
MBRuss
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Still not gotten around to getting this cap off, however I do have a couple of questions about setting the machine up and putting it away again.

The manual says to turn it on with the trigger pressed. Doing this causes it to pulse as air moves through the system. Is it better to hold the trigger down for a minute before turning the machine on, just to run all the air out completely?

And for putting it away, it says to unplug the hose and run the machine for around 20 - 30 seconds (IIRC) to get all the water out. Again, is that necessary? I have been running it for around 10 seconds like this and that seems to get most of the water out.

Also, is this even necessary in summer, or is it more of a winter precaution to prevent water from freezing in the pump and cracking it?

Thanks
Russell
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Old 05-06-2018, 12:50 PM   #278
Kranzle
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Hi Russell,
You should be squeezing the trigger as you turn the machine on as this gives the water somewhere to go, if you don’t squeeze the trigger then as the motor builds up speed the pressure can stall the motor, which blows a fuse. You can squeeze the trigger for as long as you like before you turn the machine on, this will help clear the air out of the pump. Squeezing and releasing the trigger a few times can also help purge the air from the system.

For putting the machine away it is recommended to run the machine for a short while to clear the water out, there are a few reasons for this. It helps protect the machine against frost damage during the winter but during the summer it helps to prevent the valves from sticking. If you leave a glass of water in the sun until it all evaporates you may notice white power/deposits in the glass. In the pump this can stick the valves closed, which means next week when you use the machine it may be pulsing because they are stuck.
10 seconds should be sufficient but the seals have 1 hour dry run protection, so running them for even as much as 30 seconds is fine.

William
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Old 05-06-2018, 12:59 PM   #279
MBRuss
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Thanks William. I don't really understand this though, because I thought the pressure switch would cut out the motor anyway, as that's how the auto stop feature works? Or is it different when you first start the machine?

If I don't run all the air out of the machine before switching it on, can that harm the machine as the air slowly moves out? The manual mentions ensuring adequate water supply to avoid cavitation, so I wasn't sure if the same is applicable when you first start the machine and air is still in there?

Also, say I'm out cleaning the car and (being as methodical as I am) I take all day about it. Generally I tend to switch the machine on, jet wash the car, then go and switch it off until I next need it. Should I not be doing this, and instead just leaving it switched on all day until I pack it away?

I've been switching it on and off, but not pulling the trigger before each time that I switch it on, because nothing has really changed in the 10 minutes since I last used it. I assume that's OK (if a little unnecessary)?

Thanks
Russell

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Old 06-06-2018, 03:28 PM   #280
Kranzle
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The pressure switch only cuts out the motor when there is pressure. If it’s the first time you are using the machine there shouldn’t be pressure in the line. Turning the machine on and off as a double up to the standby wouldn’t make much difference.
If you accidentally pick up the gun a squeeze the trigger but didn’t turn the machine on at the switch, then make sure you are then squeezing as you push the on button.

Getting as much air out the system before you turn it on is a good idea, when you pressurize air it compresses. As the pressure builds it will squeeze an air bubble to a tiny size and if you release the trigger the air bubble will grow as the pressure changes from 130 Bar to less than 10 Bar. When the pressure changes the size of an air bubble tremendous heat occurs and these little bubbles can burn/explode holes into components inside the pump.
During normal operation only water should be inside the pump, no air.

Leaving the machine in standby is fine but also turning it off is a second safety measure in the event of a hose bursting for example.
Keep and eye on your hose fittings and trigger gun because if any of them start leaking then that will mess with the machine on standby. If the machine makes a hunting noise when you switch it back on, the pressure had leaked out of the line. Sometimes a machine will hunt, sometimes it might blow a fuse, which can be very annoying if you don’t have a spare. Squeezing the trigger when switching the machine on does avoid that situation.

William
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