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Old 27-12-2017, 11:48 PM   #1
mawallace
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Wheels stuck to axle

Took car into garage today and the front wheels were stuck to the axke. Took a lot of banging etc to get it off.
The alloy wheels had were the culprit as they hadn't been off for a year.
Any idea how this can be solved.
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Old 27-12-2017, 11:56 PM   #2
Streeto
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Copper grease on mating face between wheel and hub. After cleaning all the corrosion off.
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Old 28-12-2017, 12:10 AM   #3
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Thanks for that. Someone told me that putting grease on them could cause problems with the wheels.
What's the best way to apply it and presumably a light covering
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Old 28-12-2017, 01:01 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawallace View Post
Thanks for that. Someone told me that putting grease on them could cause problems with the wheels.
What's the best way to apply it and presumably a light covering
Make sure its Copper Grease and not just regular stuff, yeah just a thin covering onto the hub is enough to suffice. Buy the one in a tub the aerosol stuff wont be as good. If there off regularly enough there not much bother. I have had one or two that have been bad, worst was one where owner seemingly lived on the brakes as the wheels were black and they were a right pain to get off, not sure if this contributes to making it worse to get off.
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Old 28-12-2017, 01:07 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawallace View Post
Thanks for that. Someone told me that putting grease on them could cause problems with the wheels.
What's the best way to apply it and presumably a light covering

As above, a thin smear of copper grease where the alloy wheel hits the hub will stop this reoccurring - you should be able to pick up a small tube of it easily if you've nothing else to use it for...
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Old 28-12-2017, 02:10 AM   #6
Harry_p
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It's usually where the nose of the hub sits inside the wheel hub. Give the hub a good wire brush then a quick rub with a bit of emery cloth.

I'd just wipe a little grease around the lip of the hub with a finger, shouldn't need any at all on the actual face of the hub as it will tend to get squeezed and flung out and make a mess.

Remember to tighten the wheels back up to the recommended setting and not just wrench them on as hard as you can.
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Old 28-12-2017, 07:52 AM   #7
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The best way is to use silicon grease on the hub nose and a light smear on the mating faces.
Preferably no copper grease / copaslip as you add another metal and increase galvanic corrosion.
Good silicon grease is more than enough heat resistant (if you are not driving a race car with red glowing brake disc's

Copper grease or copaslip should be only used for steel on steel or cars iron on cast iron as the influence of galvanic corrosion will be negligible.
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Old 28-12-2017, 09:02 AM   #8
Kirkyworld
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I've used a small amount of copper slip on every car with alloy wheels I've ever owned. I've never had a wheel stuck on the hub since, never had the grease come out onto the wheels or had any corrosion issues at all.
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Old 28-12-2017, 09:15 AM   #9
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I agree with Caledonian copper slip is old hat and designed for steel.
It can react with some alloys and cause oxidation so why risk it when there are much better greases available.
ACF Corrosion block would be a far better option
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Old 28-12-2017, 10:04 AM   #10
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Copper grease is old school and yes, back in the day it was used for everything and with good results. Doesn't mean it's the correct method though an I bet on the back of the alloy wheel you will see a white coating forming, that's the galvanic corrosion
Brake manufacturers do not recommend copper slip as most parts are aluminium.
Loads of other lubes out there.
The next old debate is lubing wheel stud/bolts. Some old boys used a bit of copper slip here too, for years and had no problems. Problem being though is that the recommended torque setting is a dry setting. The use of a lube here magnifies this.Well it would wouldn't it, you just added a lube.
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