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Old 05-07-2018, 01:03 PM   #1
edthedrummer
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Kranzle 115 - Restoration/Retrofit/Upgrade

Hello all,

Been a long time since I last contributed anything on here as a young lad but I'm back with a small challenge.

I've recently become the owner of an old Kranzle 115. It's a bit of an old beast, a May 1994 vintage according to its serial number. It requires a little bit of TLC, but was a bargain so couldn't say no.

What I am interested in, is from reading up on here, kranzles of old require starting with the trigger depressed presumably to soften the pressure spike in start up. But they don't actually turn off when you depress the trigger.

The new models, from around 2012 onwards have the total stop system and soft start. Parts are potentially readily available and Kranzle even go as far as stating that the soft start kit can be retrofitted to older machinery on there website.

My plan is to get this old girl up and running, replace the cracked old hose and bent lance and then go about retro fitting a form of pressure switch that turns the machine off when the trigger is depressed/pressure reaches a target.

Is anybody able to shed any light on doing something like this? Doesn't have to be a Kranzle, could just be an electrical engineer shedding some light on an oversight of mine?

Thanks,

Ed
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Old 05-07-2018, 04:44 PM   #2
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Hi Ed,

Could you post a picture of the pump? Being an early 2004 model I expect it actually has an external unloader, should look like a two part pumphead.
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Old 05-07-2018, 10:25 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kranzle View Post
Hi Ed,

Could you post a picture of the pump? Being an early 2004 model I expect it actually has an external unloader, should look like a two part pumphead.
No problems.


Untitled by Edward Ashton, on Flickr

Untitled by Edward Ashton, on Flickr

Untitled by Edward Ashton, on Flickr

Last edited by edthedrummer; 05-07-2018 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 06-07-2018, 12:56 PM   #4
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Hi Ed,
That looks like the standard pump head which ran a production of around 14 years. The very first 94 models had a slightly different pump head; I had one in the workshop last week in fact.

The picture almost looks like on your serial number sticker it has the letter E before the numbers, which should make the machine a 95 model, still a vintage none the less!


Fitting an ‘Easy Start’ is a standard retro fit. The ‘Easy Start’ would soften the load on the motor when being switched on if the trigger is closed (not being squeezed). If you squeeze the trigger when turning on the machine then the easy start does nothing, but if the guns closed it helps. The device is an internal pressure relief valve of sorts.

A ‘Pressure Switch’ will turn the machine off when the trigger is released.
If you compare the machines to cars, your current system is much like pulling up at a set of traffic lights and pressing down on the clutch. The engine is still running but you have stopped and motor didn’t stall, its still using fuel but not under any load. This is how your machine works, the trigger is released and the motor is still spinning but the pressure has dropped to zero and its just sitting happy, its not using as much electricity and can be left in this state.
Much like a car, if you leave the motor running for a long time without moving, the motor will start to get hot. So it’s best on a hot day to switch it off and help prevent overheating. (I know a car may have an electric fan to prevent overheating but that’s not the point)

New cars built these days have start stop systems, this means when you stop at the lights, the car switches off. On new pressure washers, when you release the trigger the machine switches off.
Both cases are to make them more environmentally friendly, they don’t switch off because they have to, they switch off because they want to.

Wanting to retro fit a pressure switch is like wanting to fit a start stop system to an old car. It can be done but it could be expensive and in reality it’s just turning the machine off for you, if you’re not using the machine for a while I would suggest you save yourself some money and just flick the switch.

I will happily provide you a list of part numbers required to make the pressure switch change if you wish, but it would include a new pump head.

William
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Old 06-07-2018, 02:50 PM   #5
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Many thanks for the response William,

It sounds like all I really want to do is the soft start, which even that could be a semi pointless task? Although perhaps convenient to not have a machine that is spraying under pressure when I switch on.

Out of interest how expensive is the soft start kit?

I was under the impression the pressure washer did not like being left on in between pulling the trigger. Perhaps I misconstrued some other topics on the matter. Having explained it like you have done I understand the process a little better.

Other questions I have, if I want to strip the brass valve area down to clean out (reason to believe it’s pretty gross) what’s best to clean brass up with? Any recommendations?

Lance selection, what is recommended for car cleaning duties? It came with an old Vario Lance but it’s bent and looks past its best, and as I need to replace the hose anyway, I might as well do the lance. The Pico gun looks okay, are there ever any rebuild kits for these? Or maintenance required?

Ed
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Old 09-07-2018, 04:51 PM   #6
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No problem Ed, I’m here to help and explain technical aspects of the pumps.

The Easy Start is a good idea, it can only help. The retro fit kit is part number 490411 and should cost around £20 + P&P Inc Vat.

You might not want to leave the machine running without squeezing the trigger for a long time, but it’s no issue for short periods of time. If you use the machine for a pre wash, and then cover the vehicle in foam using a foam lance attachment. It might then be worth switching the machine off while the foam has time to dwell and you work around your wheels for example. Then fire up the machine to wash the vehicle down again.
Everyone’s technique is different but it’s not uncommon to switch the machine off for a while mid cleaning procedure.

For cleaning brass we actually use a sandblaster here, but wire wool and Brasso do a nice job of bringing back a shine.

Originally that model machine came with a lance with chem regulator, it had a fixed spray pattern but could be twisted to drop the pressure and use chemical. The Vario lance has a longer head and you can see two fins that clamp down on the water to adjust the spray pattern. The Vario jet is sold with many of today’s machines and it a good all round lance.
We also do a selection of short ‘stub’ lances, foam lances and hook lances.

The Pico was replaced by the Midi, which was then replaced by the M2000, it’s mostly the same gun with a few updates and improvements. Repair kits are available but aren’t a huge saving on replacement trigger guns. Kranzle hose, gun and lances are good quality but a full set would cost around £135 + Vat.

You are best speaking to your local supplier about prices on Kranzle accessories as i'm sure they could put together a good package price for you.

William
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Old 10-07-2018, 09:05 AM   #7
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Is it possible to retrofit the total stop to a 7/120 kraenzle?
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Old 10-07-2018, 12:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicfan View Post
Is it possible to retrofit the total stop to a 7/120 kraenzle?
Please see the 'Ask Kranzle a question' Thread, as this has been covered.

http://www.detailingworld.co.uk/foru...d.php?t=324879
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:10 AM   #9
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William,

With regards to the lances, can you explain what the numbers relate to when they are advertised as 042 nozzle for instance? Currently trying to decide what I need for general car cleaning duties, wether a fixed lance is better/simpler than a Vario.

Ed
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Old 06-08-2018, 09:56 AM   #10
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Hi Ed, those numbers relate to the orifice size. It’s a standard system that most pressure washer manufactures work by.
The machine you have would have come with a 045. Back then the 042 didn’t exist, but since then most machines which had a 045 then became 042 in later models.

Using the 042 on the 115 would be fine.

The other numbers you see are for the fan jet angle in degrees. So a M20042 has a 20 degree spray jet and a 042 orifice. For example a D40035 would have a 40 degree but a 035 orifice, which would be too small for your machine but a D40045 would be 40 degree wide spay jet with a 045 orifice which would also suit your machine.
The Vario is avaible with a few different nozzles (028,03,042,055) so the Vario 042 would suit your machine and then you can adjust the spray patter between roughly a 00 degree to a 30 Degree.

M nozzles and D nozzles are just made from different materials, M are brass and D is stainless.

The Vario is a great because you can adjust the nozzle angle, but if you just want a simple fixed angle you can use on everything then M20042 will give more power, D25045 will clean a slightly larger area.

Hope that helps.
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