Detailing World  

Go Back   Detailing World > Detailing Products > Interior & Glass
DW Home Forum Home Merchandise Store Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Interior & Glass Discuss All your Interior Issue - Dash - Seats and All the Car Glass Areas

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 25-11-2010, 06:10 AM   #1
braymond141
Sponge Jockey
 
braymond141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 27 Posts
Leatherique Leather "dye"... Discuss what true leather dye is.

I purchased a Leatherique Laguna Seca Blue leather dye kit to do a little two-tone project on my M3. Come to find out, this isn't dye. Without any other information, can the professionals please elaborate on what a dye is, and what this crap is.

The topic of this thread has nothing to do with prep work, or how I got it to peel. I would like to discuss how this product claims to be a dye and clearly does nothing of the sort.

I appreciate all factual help

-Brett





braymond141 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 08:40 AM   #2
judyb
Thread Sponsor
 
judyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,425
Thanks: 292
Thanked 565 Times in 357 Posts
A dye penetrates the leather and soaks in and a pigment (paint) sits on the surface. Dyes can therefore only be used on leather that absorbs (ie without a pigment coating).
Think about it like wood - a stain (which is a dye) soaks in but will not hide the natural characteristics of the wood, a paint will cover the surface and hide any damage.

What you have is a pigment (paint)

Unfortuantely in the USA they do call pigments dyes which just confuses the whole issue!!!!!!!!!!

Hope this helps
__________________
http://www.lttsolutions.co.uk
Leather Care, Repair and Restoration consultants
IICRC (LCT)
NCCA
AMU
judyb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:04 AM   #3
derref
Unwashed Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 7
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For the record, the OP did not correctly prep that piece of leather.

Leatherique calls for a 4 step process (minimum) including dyeing the leather. Using a cleaner to get rid of surface dirt etc, then using a rejuvenator to bring the leather back to life. Then the most important part before dyeing: Using a prepping agent to strip the old (weak) dye from the leather piece. You soak a piece of 1000 grit sandpaper in this prepping agent and wetsand the piece lightly until the weak dye starts coming out. Sanding (with this prepping agent) is to remove the old dye, not to merely promote adhesion by sanding.

The OP failed to do all of these steps and therefore, his dye did not take. Under ideal prep conditions, the dye soaks into the leather and replaces the old dye. It's obviously not as good as vat-dying leather but it's a darn good diy solution for most consumers in the U.S.

Keep this in mind as you answer the OP's question. He did not prep properly. Had he correctly prepped, he would not have been able to merely peel up the dye like that.

It's a water based dye btw.

Here is a photo of all the necessary dyeing components:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2662/...45623959_b.jpg

Last edited by derref; 25-11-2010 at 10:13 AM.
derref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:27 AM   #4
braymond141
Sponge Jockey
 
braymond141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 27 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by derref View Post
For the record, the OP did not correctly prep that piece of leather.

Leatherique calls for a 4 step process (minimum) including dyeing the leather. Using a cleaner to get rid of surface dirt etc, then using a rejuvenator to bring the leather back to life. Then the most important part before dyeing: Using a prepping agent to strip the old (weak) dye from the leather piece. You soak a piece of 1000 grit sandpaper in this prepping agent and wetsand the piece lightly until the weak dye starts coming out. Sanding (with this prepping agent) is to remove the old dye, not to merely promote adhesion by sanding.

The OP failed to do all of these steps and therefore, his dye did not take. Under ideal prep conditions, the dye soaks into the leather and replaces the old dye. It's obviously not as good as vat-dying leather but it's a darn good diy solution for most consumers in the U.S.

Keep this in mind as you answer the OP's question. He did not prep properly. Had he correctly prepped, he would not have been able to merely peel up the dye like that.

It's a water based dye btw.

Here is a photo of all the necessary dyeing components:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2662/...45623959_b.jpg
Neil, you were given the answer as I already told you. I also never discussed the prepping which was done adequately and with all their products

Quote:
A dye penetrates the leather and soaks in and a pigment (paint) sits on the surface. Dyes can therefore only be used on leather that absorbs (ie without a pigment coating).
Think about it like wood - a stain (which is a dye) soaks in but will not hide the natural characteristics of the wood, a paint will cover the surface and hide any damage.

What you have is a pigment (paint)

Unfortuantely in the USA they do call pigments dyes which just confuses the whole issue!!!!!!!!!!

Hope this helps
Thank you so much; that's exactly what I concluded myself.
braymond141 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:29 AM   #5
Hou
PC Perfectionist
 
Hou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Leeds
Posts: 331
Thanks: 32
Thanked 104 Times in 87 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by derref View Post
For the record, the OP did not correctly prep that piece of leather.

Leatherique calls for a 4 step process (minimum) including dyeing the leather. Using a cleaner to get rid of surface dirt etc, then using a rejuvenator to bring the leather back to life. Then the most important part before dyeing: Using a prepping agent to strip the old (weak) dye from the leather piece. You soak a piece of 1000 grit sandpaper in this prepping agent and wetsand the piece lightly until the weak dye starts coming out. Sanding (with this prepping agent) is to remove the old dye, not to merely promote adhesion by sanding.

The OP failed to do all of these steps and therefore, his dye did not take. Under ideal prep conditions, the dye soaks into the leather and replaces the old dye. It's obviously not as good as vat-dying leather but it's a darn good diy solution for most consumers in the U.S.

Keep this in mind as you answer the OP's question. He did not prep properly. Had he correctly prepped, he would not have been able to merely peel up the dye like that.

It's a water based dye btw.

Here is a photo of all the necessary dyeing components:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2662/...45623959_b.jpg

Manufacturer?

Love the colour of the blue!

Did the kit come with instructions as mentioned above?
Hou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:38 AM   #6
braymond141
Sponge Jockey
 
braymond141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 27 Posts
Judyb; if you could explain what product would dye leather and give a perfect, factory matte finish, I'd love to know.

The leather in question is BMW Nappa.
braymond141 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:38 AM   #7
braymond141
Sponge Jockey
 
braymond141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 27 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hou View Post
Manufacturer?

Love the colour of the blue!

Did the kit come with instructions as mentioned above?
That kit manufacturer is Leatherique, same product as mine, just Cinnamon instead of LSB. And my issues were with the product not actually dying, but leaving a "latex" painted finish; that's something that it does regardless of how much Leatherique asks you to sand the leather (with 400grit sand paper mind you).
braymond141 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:50 AM   #8
derref
Unwashed Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 7
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by braymond141 View Post
Neil, you were given the answer as I already told you. I also never discussed the prepping which was done adequately and with all their products
This is a direct lie. If you had correctly/actually used the prepping agent, your armrest pictures would not be black at all. Prepping agent completely strips the leather of all the old dye. YOU ARE LYING TO EVERYONE HERE

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hou View Post
Manufacturer?

Love the colour of the blue!

Did the kit come with instructions as mentioned above?
Yes. You MUST follow specific prepping instructions which the OP failed to follow

Quote:
Originally Posted by braymond141 View Post
That kit manufacturer is Leatherique, same product as mine, just Cinnamon instead of LSB. And my issues were with the product not actually dying, but leaving a "latex" painted finish; that's something that it does regardless of how much Leatherique asks you to sand the leather (with 400grit sand paper mind you).
THIS IS A LIE AGAIN. I have dyed properly using leatherique and when you prep the leather correctly, the dye does not act like latex paint at all. It does not just sit on the surface like that. It soaks into the leather like dye should. There are hundreds of documented cases on the net where people have used leatherique products and their dye acts like dye, soaking into the leather. This is because they prepped properly WHICH YOU DIDNT DO.

If anyone wants to see how to properly prep leather products using this leatherique, visit their website:

www.leatherique.com

EDIT: Just to clarify, I'm not in any way affiliated with leatherique. I merely did a huge interior restoration project last year using leatherique products and the OP here is trying to get the answer he wants by providing false information and manipulating you guys.

Here is how leatherique dyes should turn out when used properly: the thread is huge but if you care to read through it...

http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?p=11006569

Last edited by derref; 25-11-2010 at 10:56 AM.
derref is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 10:58 AM   #9
braymond141
Sponge Jockey
 
braymond141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 27 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by derref View Post
This is a direct lie.




Just let them answer the questions Neil. The guys here know a lot more than you or I do and can explain things much better. Don't drag that nonsense thread into this, just provide them with information and let them answer. This is how I found out about Gliptone and learned my lesson over never using Leatherique leather care again.

Last edited by braymond141; 25-11-2010 at 11:02 AM.
braymond141 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2010, 11:02 AM   #10
derref
Unwashed Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 7
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't care if you have it, you didn't use it. If you used it, the leather pictured wouldn't be black AT ALL. As I already said, it's a dye stripper essentially. When you use it CORRECTLY, your leather pieces turn gray

In addition, your leather is still shiny under there. Once you actually sand it with prepping agent, it becomes completely matte. Which it isn't AT ALL.
derref is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:59 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
DTO Garage vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
DTO Garage vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors