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Old 29-12-2017, 10:19 AM   #21
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interesting article I happened to stumble across a few weeks ago on this subject.

https://textar-professional.com/text...modern-brakes/

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Old 29-12-2017, 09:13 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caledoniandream View Post
The best way is to use silicon grease on the hub nose and a light smear on the mating faces.
Preferably no copper grease / copaslip as you add another metal and increase galvanic corrosion.
Good silicon grease is more than enough heat resistant (if you are not driving a race car with red glowing brake disc's

Copper grease or copaslip should be only used for steel on steel or cars iron on cast iron as the influence of galvanic corrosion will be negligible.
I've always used copper grease or 'never sieze' but that is an interesting point about the copper grease inhibiting corrosion. Thankyou
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Old 30-12-2017, 11:49 PM   #23
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Very helpful thread and I'll not be using copper grease anymore!

Messaged a chap I've bought from before on the Bay and he cane back with a suggestion of aluminium graphite anti seize paste. From the description it sounds perfect and having chatted to this guy before he knows his stuff and then some.

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F391937768282
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Old 31-12-2017, 01:53 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caledoniandream View Post
The best way is to use silicon grease on the hub nose and a light smear on the mating faces.
Preferably no copper grease / copaslip as you add another metal and increase galvanic corrosion.
Good silicon grease is more than enough heat resistant (if you are not driving a race car with red glowing brake disc's

Copper grease or copaslip should be only used for steel on steel or cars iron on cast iron as the influence of galvanic corrosion will be negligible.


I too believe coppaslip etc should not be used on alloys to steel due to the dissimilar metals problems. Not thought of silicone grease (due to not having any in a tin, only spray, but what I have used is cerratec - a good heatproof 'solid' grease.
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Old 31-12-2017, 02:34 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTIRed View Post
interesting article I happened to stumble across a few weeks ago on this subject.

https://textar-professional.com/text...modern-brakes/
After reading that very article a few weeks ago too, I bought this...

https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l...0250&0&cc5_150
£2.79 with "xmas" code



Additional interesting point in the sales pitch...

Quote:
0% Copper content ensure no interferance with ABS sensors

some more DW reading on the subject...

http://www.detailingworld.co.uk/foru...d.php?t=400925

Will be good for evil alloy valve caps too - I don't know why I keep using them!


Last edited by Forsh; 31-12-2017 at 02:46 AM.
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Old 31-12-2017, 09:41 AM   #26
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Re silicone grease, I'm told from my man in the know that "silicone will protect from water but has no strength to protect from fretting. Even though wheels are bolted tight against the hub you still have vibration and lots of it. This alone attacks the alloys due to them being the softer of the two mating metals."
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Old 31-12-2017, 10:04 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDC250 View Post
Re silicone grease, I'm told from my man in the know that "silicone will protect from water but has no strength to protect from fretting. Even though wheels are bolted tight against the hub you still have vibration and lots of it. This alone attacks the alloys due to them being the softer of the two mating metals."
A wheel “should” not be fretting as it means it’s not tight enough.
We are using silicone grease on the Alcoa's on our trucks to avoid that they are stuck (up to 10 ton per axle ) never had any fretting as the wheel would wear rapidly and become loose.
The wheel and flange should move as one object ( like welded together) hence the reason that they seize.

This is one of the most important reasons to make sure your mating surfaces are clean and free of thick paint ( brushed on or several layers) we just smear it lightly with silicone grease with a little brush or with my fingers on the car.
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Old 31-12-2017, 10:17 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caledoniandream View Post
A wheel “should” not be fretting as it means it’s not tight enough.

We are using silicone grease on the Alcoa's on our trucks to avoid that they are stuck (up to 10 ton per axle ) never had any fretting as the wheel would wear rapidly and become loose.

The wheel and flange should move as one object ( like welded together) hence the reason that they seize.



This is one of the most important reasons to make sure your mating surfaces are clean and free of thick paint ( brushed on or several layers) we just smear it lightly with silicone grease with a little brush or with my fingers on the car.

What you say makes perfect sense to me. A wheel torqued to the right setting should as you say have virtually no, if any movement. As you've no doubt picked up on, I'm far from expert but it seems to me thinking about it that you couldn't fully negate all movement? think that's why the aluminium graphite has been suggested over the silicone. End of the day if the silicone works for you and it clearly does then that's all that matters. I'm just feeding back what I've been advised and it's then down to people to take from that what they want. I should stress I've got no affiliation whatsoever to the seller of the product I linked.

As he sells both silicone grease and aluminium graphite and has no reason to suggest one over the other, save for he thinks it's the right product for the job I'm giving the latter a go. Either way it has (fingers crossed!) got to be better than using the previous copper grease.
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Old 31-12-2017, 10:21 AM   #29
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Vehicle manufacturers will gives specifics on whether to lube the nut/bolts or not. The product to use on modern vehicles is a ceramic based grease such as Mintex Ceretex (as mentioned by someone else), this should be sparingly smeared around the hub spigot and not on the mating faces.
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Old 31-12-2017, 10:47 AM   #30
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Silicone grease is not used for it’s “lubricating” qualities but for it’s insulating properties.
It insulated the contact surfaces from the electricity created by the galvanic corrosion, and that way stopping the galvanic corrosion from happening.
Hence the reason to use it thinly on the matting surfaces.
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