Detailing World  

Go Back   Detailing World > Detailing Products > Waxes, Sealants & Paint Protection
DW Home Forum Home Merchandise Store Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Waxes, Sealants & Paint Protection Sponsored by DODO JUICE Light Fantastic , Banana Armour, Orange Crush, Rainforest Rub, Purple Haze - www.dodojuice.com

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 15-07-2019, 05:34 PM   #11
dandpl
Sponge Jockey
 
dandpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: South West England
Posts: 34
Thanks: 20
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by suds View Post
I would consider either a cleanser polish (with little abrasion) or a pure polish by hand to cleanse the paintwork. If you are looking for a paint specific wax then swissvax or Mitchell & King already advertise paint specific waxes - we like pics

Btw are looking to mask the swirls? I personally would apply wax to the bare paint and go for a wax with gloss which distracts the eye away from specific blemishes

Where is the car located, is it garaged, is it an occasional driver, what colour?
Many thanks for that. It is garaged used weekly and soft green. Having trouble posting pictures but got one now on my profile.
dandpl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2019, 05:36 PM   #12
dandpl
Sponge Jockey
 
dandpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: South West England
Posts: 34
Thanks: 20
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by GleemSpray View Post
If the paint is in half decent condition, then i would have thought that Autoglym SRP would be the perfect product to use?

Its gentle on paint, cleans and polishes well, plus it leaves a couple of months of protection for an everyday driver - longer for a low use car.
Many thanks for that. It is garaged used weekly and soft green. Having trouble posting pictures but got one now on my profile.
dandpl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2019, 05:37 PM   #13
dandpl
Sponge Jockey
 
dandpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: South West England
Posts: 34
Thanks: 20
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlos Fandango View Post
If the paintwork is faded any cleaner wax should be ideal. Lots of people swear by Autoglym SRP. Personally I get just as good results from Triplewax Car Polish. Both will restore the colour and mask mild defects in the paintwork. Please bear in mind that all cleaner waxes do not last that long - you will likely need to use them on a monthly basis. As a top up I would suggest using a drying aid when washing - lots to choose eg Sonax bsd etc.

If the paintwork is not faded the a carnauba wax would be the way to go - Harly Wax or G3 Super Gloss would be ideal.
Many thanks
dandpl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2019, 05:40 PM   #14
dandpl
Sponge Jockey
 
dandpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: South West England
Posts: 34
Thanks: 20
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks

Thanks to everybody who posted I am not great with photos or posting.
dandpl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2019, 08:48 PM   #15
Steampunk
OCD Sufferer (Obsessive Car Detailer)
 
Steampunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Ohio, USA
Posts: 1,576
Thanks: 700
Thanked 1,892 Times in 888 Posts
Garage
Lovely car... Humbers are wonderful.

I'm the owner of a 1977 MG MGB Roadster, with factory original paint... I have owned this car for many, many years, and cut my teeth in detailing with it. I really enjoy these old paints, and will take the opportunity to detail them over a modern clearcoat finish any day of the week... It's like cooking with cast iron or carbon steel vs. stainless; it just has a different feel. Like iron or carbon vs. stainless, vintage finishes are also more 'reactive', and sensitive to oxidation and certain chemicals.

Detailing classic and vintage finishes is filled with many internet myths and misconceptions... When you work with these materials, you learn just how silly, or even harmful some of them are.



This is what solvent staining looks like on classic paint, after using a solvent-heavy polish alone.

What wax I would suggest in this case depends upon what you're trying to do with it... Is the finish oxidized, and you just want to 'lock in the patina', and protect it a bit and make it easier to wash, or do you actually want to improve the look?

If you want to 'lock in the patina', without any type of prep, I would definitely avoid any product that contains abrasives (Cleaner-waxes, AIO's like SRP, prepping with oily glazes, etc.), and I wouldn't waste your money on expensive 'classic' waxes like Zymol, etc. I'd clay with Bilt-Hamber Auto-Clay, then pick a kind of old-school, solvent-heavy hybrid wax like one of the Collinites, or Bilt-Hamber Finis Wax or Double Speed... You won't get the durability over an oxidized finish that you will over a prepped and polished one, but they'll bond and seal over this surface better than 'fancier' products.

If your interest in waxing the finish is to improve its gloss and appearance, I would suggest claying, followed by an abrasive polish cycle to remove the oxidation (How aggressive depends on the state of the finish; using a DA or rotary buffer will make it a lot easier, and waste less paint in the process than doing it in the process... Ask me how I know. ) and then follow with Stangalang's advice below:

Quote:
Originally Posted by stangalang View Post
I would honestly have a look at optimum car wax if its for a classic car. Due to it having uv inhibitors and working as part of a system with onr should you want to. You get to reduce the moisture you introduce and add actual protection from the sun
Using OCW after every wash (It's fast and easy; like a QD.), and then maintaining the vehicle with ONR or Opti-Clean will be the kindest to the finish, and help to prevent trapping too much water in the vehicle to stimulate rust, as is possible... OCW is water based, and will not cause solvent-blooming like so many petroleum based products can on these finishes...



By the way, this is what these paints can look like, with a bit of wetsanding and polishing...

I fully appreciate if you want to just keep it as it is... It's a somewhat safer route, and a lot of people like the look of a 'well worn' classic; like a 10-year old pair of house slippers. If you want this, just seal the paint with an 'insulating' layer, so to speak, and also make sure to waxoyl the snot out of the underside, and every hidden cavity (If anything, this is more important.)... If you want to turn it into a show-car, it's a long, careful, thoughtful road (With potential for mistakes.), but you can really make these older paints gleam. This is a much bigger subject than 'what wax', as the vehicle needs a bit of love. In this case, still waxoyl the snot out of it...

Hope this helps... If you have any other classic related questions, feel free to ask, or PM.

- Steampunk
Steampunk is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Steampunk For This Useful Post:
suds (15-07-2019)
Old 15-07-2019, 09:13 PM   #16
suds
OCD Sufferer (Obsessive Car Detailer)
 
suds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Isle of Ynys Mon
Posts: 1,941
Thanks: 747
Thanked 837 Times in 637 Posts
Garage
Wouldn't disagree with stangalang/steampunk every day's a school day in this game
suds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2019, 09:52 PM   #17
JJ_
DW Sponsor
 
JJ_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 5,333
Thanks: 1,505
Thanked 2,055 Times in 1,274 Posts
Garage
Classic car wax is something I took a real interest in, we used UV inhibitors as well as "softer" ingredients which a more gentle - typically because they aren't clear coated so a bit more "open" the elements.
__________________
JJ_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
DTO Garage vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
DTO Garage vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors