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Old 26-04-2021, 04:30 PM   #21
shl-kelso
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The newer models from Hyundai and Kia should have much better charging curves, so potentially much faster rapid charging potential compared to the Kona/e-Niro, so if time is on your side I’d be waiting until you could get a closer look at either of these. They generally have better efficiency than many other EV offerings too, so range will be potentially better than many similarly sized options such as the Audi and Merc models.
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Old 26-04-2021, 07:12 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Summit Detailing View Post
Ioniq5 first drive from Jonny here -
https://youtu.be/A6RsmzCYB3I

This is what I'd buy if I wanted an EV

Cheers,

Chris
Saw that on Twitter and watched. Very impressive EV. Nice design and good layout. Don't know pricing at this stage.

COuldn't see what the rear legroom was like. Was almost as if they couldn't show too many close up shots as it was a pre-production vehicle.
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Old 26-04-2021, 07:49 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Coops View Post
Saw that on Twitter and watched. Very impressive EV. Nice design and good layout. Don't know pricing at this stage.

COuldn't see what the rear legroom was like. Was almost as if they couldn't show too many close up shots as it was a pre-production vehicle.
Agreed, looked fantastic as an EV option.

I think the rear seats were powered & with the 30% reduction on front seat backs should be ample

If I closed my eyes and squinted. I could see a very slight likeness to a Lancia Delta Integrale
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Old 26-04-2021, 08:04 PM   #24
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Agreed, looked fantastic as an EV option.

I think the rear seats were powered & with the 30% reduction on front seat backs should be ample

If I closed my eyes and squinted. I could see a very slight likeness to a Lancia Delta Integrale
Definite modern day Integrale, yes.

Liked the way those rear seats moved.
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Old 26-04-2021, 08:10 PM   #25
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Definite modern day Integrale, yes.

Liked the way those rear seats moved.
Yes, I like a lot

A longer wheel base than a Range Rover. Loads of cabin space.

A little miffed at the solar roof only for the 1st edition cars
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Old 26-04-2021, 09:36 PM   #26
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I'll throw something interesting into the mix. my bosses have four electric vehicles in the company, two Tesla Model X and two Porsche Taycan turbo S. One thing which became apparent when they just had the Teslas, one was on charge at one of the boss's house, he closed his garage door, the electric heaters switched on when the garage door closed, and shortly after his electric tripped out. It was asking too much to be able to charge the car and heat the garage. This is not unique, the other boss had much the same trouble, he has actually had three phase installed at his house now, as the chargers pull so much from the grid. I will add that they both have the most up to date electric systems in their houses, so it has not been added to time and again. The big concern is that, as more people make the switch, the electricity grid will not be able to cope.
Another thing which concerns me is that we are careering headlong into consigning petrol and diesel vehicles to history, but the infrastructure is nowhere near where it needs to be. What about people who live in flats? Or in a terraced house which fronts onto the pavement? How will they be able to safely charge their vehicle? Trail the charger cable across the pavement? It is coming, but we are not ready for it at all.
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Old 26-04-2021, 10:15 PM   #27
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I'll throw something interesting into the mix. my bosses have four electric vehicles in the company, two Tesla Model X and two Porsche Taycan turbo S. One thing which became apparent when they just had the Teslas, one was on charge at one of the boss's house, he closed his garage door, the electric heaters switched on when the garage door closed, and shortly after his electric tripped out. It was asking too much to be able to charge the car and heat the garage. This is not unique, the other boss had much the same trouble, he has actually had three phase installed at his house now, as the chargers pull so much from the grid. I will add that they both have the most up to date electric systems in their houses, so it has not been added to time and again. The big concern is that, as more people make the switch, the electricity grid will not be able to cope.
Another thing which concerns me is that we are careering headlong into consigning petrol and diesel vehicles to history, but the infrastructure is nowhere near where it needs to be. What about people who live in flats? Or in a terraced house which fronts onto the pavement? How will they be able to safely charge their vehicle? Trail the charger cable across the pavement? It is coming, but we are not ready for it at all.

Sounds like they did not do their due diligence i. that case. The first thing any electrician should do before adding a large load such as an EV charger is to do a load calculation to ensure the existing supply to which the EV charger is to be added is capable of taking the load.

For example, I have a 4 bed house with detached double garage, which is all-electric - ground source heat pump for heating and hot water, plus electric cooking etc. My incoming supply is 100A single phase, and when I have my first EV there was no issue adding a 32A charger as the load calculation (including allowed diversity) was within the 100A supply capacity. We then bought a second EV, and wanted a second 32A charger. This would have overloaded my supply if all loads were running at maximum, so my local DNO (the electrical company who look after the electrical distribution network) would only give permission to my installer if there was a fail-safe method to ensure the supply could not be overloaded, and i. this case I had to use a charger that included incoming supply monitoring ie a smart charger. This measure the incoming supply load and if it reaches a pre-determined level (85A in my case, as specified by the DNO) then it steps down the charge rate, or even stops completely, to ensure the supply remains below the permitted level.

In my case both chargers are in my garage, which has a 100A supply cable direct from the meter, as I knew I wanted the ability to have large electrical loads fed from the supply (my house was self-built about 15 years ago so I was fully in control of all construction decisions). The problem with most existing houses is that garages are often fed with a supply capable of 40A max, and somethings even lower. This is on for some sockets and a lighting circuit, but has no headroom for anything else.

For the install where there is electrical heating that trips the supply when the EV charger is used should never have occurred if the electrician was doing his job properly - he should have either declined to install the charger as the supply was insufficient, or insisted that the supply was upgraded to meet the increased supply. That has nothing to do with EVs specifically - it could just have easily been a hot tub added for example and had exactly the same issue.

And 3-phase upgrades are also not unusual if the house is large and there are significant new loads. My neighbour has added a couple of 1-bed holiday lodges on land adjacent to his house, with hot tubs using 3.5kW heaters, but still needed to upgrade to a 3x100A supply to cover all the requirements. He could now also add two or three 32A EV chargers without worrying about load management.

There’s a lot of mid-information about how mass-adoption of EVs will overload the grid. The reality is that once we see EVs being used with vehicle-to-grid-capable charging then the grid will be more than happy with mass adoption of EVs as this gives the grid a nationwide energy store to help balance the grid. There are also interviews with spokespeople from the grid who specifically state how more EVs charging overnight on cheap-rate electricity would be a benefit as they avoid the need to drop generating capacity overnight when normal demand drops significantly just now.

We are likely to see time-of-day tariffs becoming more popular as smart metering increases. Some companies have already offered such tariffs, and while this means that users can see some very high unit rates for periods of peak demand, this contrasts with other times when the supplier rates go negative, ie the supplier actually pays you to use power! So those with large battery EVs were actually paid to charge, while also being laid for any other power they could use such as the dishwasher and washing machine. Being able to use the car battery as an energy store (like having a large home battery store) also allows load shifting, to avoid using lower at the times when it costs the most.

Imagine how many vehicles (both private and commerical) there are in country, then imagine how much storage could be made available for the national grid of the owners allows just a small percentage of their battery capacity be made available for load management when they are not being used and are plugged into their vehicle charger. Such use offers a decent income to those owners allowing their vehicles to be used this way, and requires nothing special beyond the vehicle and a compatible EV charger/smart meter. You now have a nationwide dynamic battery energy store without any major infrastructure costs or major installation works. The technology to do this is already mostly available and is already being successfully trialled right now.
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Old 26-04-2021, 10:47 PM   #28
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I bought a Tesla Model 3 Performance in September last year. Best car I have owned. Yes there are issues with Tesla's but I have many friends who have other EV's and they all have their fair share of problems. You only hear about negative issues in the market for Tesla.

If you end up with a choice of EV's then consider the following:

1. Real world wh/mile - if you need to do lot's of miles then 250 wh per mile is the minimum you should look for. I have achieved avg 340 wh per mile since September and can get 250 now it's warming up. A long range version of any EV should get you 200 or more.

2. If like me you are not concerned about "economy" and want to enjoy driving then go for the fastest one you can get. 0-60 in approx 3 seconds doesn't get old. You will not get an amazing handling EV, physics do not allow heavy cars to handle well but test drive any you can.

3. Not sure how you will get "fuel" paid for on private mileage on an EV, especially if you are charging at home. I have a tariff from Octopus Energy that gives me 4 hours of 5p per kWh. At 200 wh per mile it would cost you 1 pence per mile in "fuel".

If you do get one then feel free to use my referral code which will give you £50 and myself £50 towards our bills. share.octopus.energy/tidy-goat-814

If you go down the Tesla route then feel free to use my referral code for 1000 free super charger miles https://www.tesla.com/referral/james98560

You cannot currently beat the Super Charger network. Hands down the second best thing about Tesla after the car.

If you have any questions let me know.
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Old 27-04-2021, 07:27 AM   #29
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I bought a Tesla Model 3 Performance in September last year. Best car I have owned. Yes there are issues with Tesla's but I have many friends who have other EV's and they all have their fair share of problems. You only hear about negative issues in the market for Tesla.

If you end up with a choice of EV's then consider the following:

1. Real world wh/mile - if you need to do lot's of miles then 250 wh per mile is the minimum you should look for. I have achieved avg 340 wh per mile since September and can get 250 now it's warming up. A long range version of any EV should get you 200 or more.

2. If like me you are not concerned about "economy" and want to enjoy driving then go for the fastest one you can get. 0-60 in approx 3 seconds doesn't get old. You will not get an amazing handling EV, physics do not allow heavy cars to handle well but test drive any you can.

3. Not sure how you will get "fuel" paid for on private mileage on an EV, especially if you are charging at home. I have a tariff from Octopus Energy that gives me 4 hours of 5p per kWh. At 200 wh per mile it would cost you 1 pence per mile in "fuel".

If you do get one then feel free to use my referral code which will give you £50 and myself £50 towards our bills. share.octopus.energy/tidy-goat-814

If you go down the Tesla route then feel free to use my referral code for 1000 free super charger miles https://www.tesla.com/referral/james98560

You cannot currently beat the Super Charger network. Hands down the second best thing about Tesla after the car.

If you have any questions let me know.
Thanks, some useful information. I've already started investigating converting the home electric tariff to an EV friendly one, my current provider does an off peak for about 4p.


The Tesla Supercharger network is a huge plus point, but there are so many good EVs from other manufacturers coming on the market that I'm starting to shift away from Tesla. Pretty much day to day I wouldn't need to recharge outside of the home, so seems pointless to jump on the Tesla wagon for the very odd occasion that i'd need the network.

As yet there is no sight of me requiring to order so the research and investigations continue. Colleagues who've replaced have started to get their EVs - mainly Tesla 3s but with the odd Merc EQC coming through now, so I'll be sure to pick their brains on daily life with an EV.
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Old 27-04-2021, 07:49 AM   #30
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The only reason to buy a Tesla is because of the supercharger network.
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