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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Experienced with Rotary polishing for some time and getting good results, occasionally I encounter rock-hard paint which I find difficult to correct.

Last weekend for example I polished a BMW E46. Really hard paint and deep RDS so I needed to use my strongest combo: M105 / FG500 and Scholl Topwool. Also tried Scholl S3 but I didn't like it that much. I varied also with polishing speeds and reducing the polished area.
But although this is a strong compounding combination, it wasn't strong enough in my experience and I had to repeat it 2 or 3 times to get to a good correction.
This consumes a lot of time.

Should I get a more aggressive wool? According to DaveKG, Meguiars Solo wool (yellow and burgundy) and Makita wool are very strong.
 

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king of the flexonian
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Experienced with Rotary polishing for some time and getting good results, occasionally I encounter rock-hard paint which I find difficult to correct.

Last weekend for example I polished a BMW E46. Really hard paint and deep RDS so I needed to use my strongest combo: M105 / FG500 and Scholl Topwool. Also tried Scholl S3 but I didn't like it that much. I varied also with polishing speeds and reducing the polished area.
But although this is a strong compounding combination, it wasn't strong enough in my experience and I had to repeat it 2 or 3 times to get to a good correction.
This consumes a lot of time.

Should I get a more aggressive wool? According to DaveKG, Meguiars Solo wool (yellow and burgundy) and Makita wool are very strong.
Right off the bat I would ask how bad is the paint/defects you are trying to remove? Not all marks are meant to be removed
Secondly, what kind of removal rates where you experiencing? This will massively weigh on how I would attack the car
 

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I look at the pictures in the studio section in awe at how fantastic the finish on the cars are but I also get a feeling that some of them have been corrected to within a few microns of clear coat. If ever there is a need for paint correction in the future for some of them it could well be improbable.

I have been on a couple of courses run by Dave KG and first off it is important to know whether or not you are dealing with someone's daily driver or hanger queen. For the daily it makes sense to only remove the swirls and leave plenty of clear coat for another day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Right off the bat I would ask how bad is the paint/defects you are trying to remove? Not all marks are meant to be removed
Secondly, what kind of removal rates where you experiencing? This will massively weigh on how I would attack the car
I know it is not always possible to remove every defect. The paint on this car was not in really bad shape, but I had problems at removing the deeper wash-induced scratches. So for me it makes sense that my polishing combination was not strong enough. Especially compared with previous cars I detailed, so I got some kind of benchmark.
I have a PTG, used it to measure the initial paint thickness, however I didn't measure the removal. Don't think it was that much since the paint was so hard.
I'm used to polishing hard paints from Audi/VW and BMW, but this was another league.

I look at the pictures in the studio section in awe at how fantastic the finish on the cars are but I also get a feeling that some of them have been corrected to within a few microns of clear coat. If ever there is a need for paint correction in the future for some of them it could well be improbable.

I have been on a couple of courses run by Dave KG and first off it is important to know whether or not you are dealing with someone's daily driver or hanger queen. For the daily it makes sense to only remove the swirls and leave plenty of clear coat for another day.
I totally agree. Let's say you polished a car to a standard of 95% defect-free. For the last 5% you have to sacrifice maybe the double amount of paint. In most cases this is not the smartest thing to do.

But on this occasion I had to use several compounding sets to come to a reasonable correction, so I asked myself if I need something more aggressive to reduce the polishing time.
 

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king of the flexonian
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I would definitely do some simple removal maths, purely so it doesn't turn into one of those "whoops" threads.
I know cars come around that have crazy hard paint, you have more than likely found one. Caution is always job one regardless. A nice quick test is scholl S3 on a spider pad, heat build up is minimal and finish is great. Take 10 readings around a focal point (stone chip for example), do a full set, let it cool and do 10 more. Work out average removal, and average paint left. If happy press on. A couple of hits with said combo should knock out 85% of standard wash defects on a ceramic coat. And only require one further finessing set. If you need more cut lake country purple wool is harsher, the twisted wool pads are even harsher. Those very harsh wools can need a further 3 sets sometimes depending on the kind of digging around you have done
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good point about the removal rate. Also a smart idea to measure around a fixed point like a stonechip. Thanks!
Spider sandwhich pad was already on my wishlist :)

I already have purple foamed wool, but it didn't touch the paint. Also have to say the I only needed one extra polishing step to finish perfect since the M105/FG500 and Scholl wool only made light holograms. Another indicator for me that it was hard paint. Finishing step was 106FA + white hex pad.
Did IPA wipedown afterwards with LED light checks.
 
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