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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Took my 911 to the Official Porsche Centre for a new clutch. As well as charging me a fortune they have scratched the car. The scratch is in quite an inconspicuous place and they have agreed to fix it.

The scratch is on the edge of the panel which is next to the rear window (the window over the engine which you look out through the rear view mirror). The edge of the rear wing where it curves over to meet the window has been scratched. It looks like something ran down the edge taking some of the paint off. There is also a small chip. The effected area is about 2 inches in length.

They have agreed to fix it. Do I let them spray the entire panel? Is this better than having the slight mark? Or is it better to keep the panel original?
 

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Like Deja vu for me with my Audi - they sprayed the panel and blended into the door. Polishing afterwards was shocking so I sorted it out myself.

Lots of cars don't have original paint, perhaps more important on a Porsche. Any pics?
 

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Ask them how they plan on fixing it, whether it will be a spot repair and blended in to the surrounding area, or if it will be a full panel respray. As long as it's a good job and doesn't come out orange peely, or whatever, then I'd go with a respray.

Also, just go to a normal garage, there's no need for "specialists" that over charge.

Edit; what year is it? My dad's 996 has had a side repainted, as well as the front bumper. Because of the age of the car, I don't believe it devalues it at all. But perhaps on a newer model it would matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's a 2006 997. It is mint, there are about 3 small marks on it apart from the recent addition. Bloody muppets, never had this problem when I used a specialist. The warranty makes it necessary to use the OPC.

In fairness, I did manage to get them to pay for the flywheel which under the warranty they weren't obliged to do. Saved me £800.
 

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If that was my car I would push to have it repaired by a bodyshop of my choice and send them the bill (or ideally get them to pay upfront). Dealerships tend to cut as many corners as they can and it wouldn't surprise me if they got a smart repairer in to do it.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If that was my car I would push to have it repaired by a bodyshop of my choice and send them the bill (or ideally get them to pay upfront). Dealerships tend to cut as many corners as they can and it wouldn't surprise me if they got a smart repairer in to do it.

Alex
In a way I'd rather have a smart repair (if it would last???). I thing that's the problem with smart repairs??
 

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If that was my car I would push to have it repaired by a bodyshop of my choice and send them the bill (or ideally get them to pay upfront). Dealerships tend to cut as many corners as they can and it wouldn't surprise me if they got a smart repairer in to do it.

Alex
I'd go with this tbh, the last thing you want on a tidy car is a smart repair. (What I tried to explain, but forgot what it's called) :lol:
 

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I'm with Alex on this. There are good and bad smart repairs but a good independent Bodyshop would be the way to go for me. Have the panel painted and blended properly and it should look perfect.
 

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I'm a smart repairer and hear comments like no such thing as a good smart repair, considering there's good and bad in every trade.

A smart repair will be fine as long as its done to a good standard you will suffer no problems with it at all. May be if you could put some pics up of the damge I would be able to tell if it can be done via smart repair. Even tho there offering to pay and correct it, way i see it is its your car so its your choice where and what is done to out it right.
 

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In a way I'd rather have a smart repair (if it would last???). I thing that's the problem with smart repairs??
Having been a painter more many years, with several of those in SMART, I'd never class a SMART repair as a permanent solution, especially where that repair includes an "open blend".

This is where the new clearcoat is blended / merged / faded / tapered out into the existing clear, within the panel.

Assuming the guy has done a good job in the first place and has used a durable 2K clearcoat for the repair (and many don't) you'll always have this blended area to worry about. Whilst the gradual tapering out of the new clear into the existing paintwork is the very essence of a good SMART repair, it is also its main downfall. Clear needs to have a minimum film build (thickness) to be inherently stable. Obviously, where this clear has been tapered out to nothing to blend it in with the surrounding paintwork this minimum thickness has to be breached, leaving the area vulnerable to attack from the elements. It's all too common to see these types of repair "edging back", as the thin layer of clear gradually breaks down and wears away, working its way back to the centre of the repair. It's usually only minor, and hard to spot, but it's there non the less.

Ironically this is likely to be less of an issue on a "detailed" car as it would be for Joe Public's, since the regular application of sealants or wax may give this vulnerable area all the protection it needs so that break down may not occur (or at least it'll be greatly reduced), but then again a round of machine polishing could cut the tapered edge of clear back, maybe eventually uncovering the coloured basecoat underneath.

So, I have nothing against SMART repairs if done well, and as I say I made my living out of doing them for plenty of years, but I would still not class them as permanent :)

Andy
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Having been a painter more many years, with several of those in SMART, I'd never class a SMART repair as a permanent solution, especially where that repair includes an "open blend".

This is where the new clearcoat is blended / merged / faded / tapered out into the existing clear, within the panel.

Assuming the guy has done a good job in the first place and has used a durable 2K clearcoat for the repair (and many don't) you'll always have this blended area to worry about. Whilst the gradual tapering out of the new clear into the existing paintwork is the very essence of a good SMART repair, it is also its main downfall. Clear needs to have a minimum film build (thickness) to be inherently stable. Obviously, where this clear has been tapered out to nothing to blend it in with the surrounding paintwork this minimum thickness has to be breached, leaving the area vulnerable to attack from the elements. It's all too common to see these types of repair "edging back", as the thin layer of clear gradually breaks down and wears away, working its way back to the centre of the repair. It's usually only minor, and hard to spot, but it's there non the less.

Ironically this is likely to be less of an issue on a "detailed" car as it would be for Joe Public's, since the regular application of sealants or wax may give this vulnerable area all the protection it needs so that break down may not occur (or at least it'll be greatly reduced), but then again a round of machine polishing could cut the tapered edge of clear back, maybe eventually uncovering the coloured basecoat underneath.

So, I have nothing against SMART repairs if done well, and as I say I made my living out of doing them for plenty of years, but I would still not class them as permanent :)

Andy
This is a great post imo. Technical info explained well. Thanks.
 
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