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Yes it is. I was telling a colleague about this only the other night.

Several years ago a mate worked for Stanley making prototype tools. They had what he described as several large bathtub type containers, filled with various grades of media. He could throw a rough cast part in at one end, then gradually move it down the finer grades to get a mirror finished end product.

He found it very useful for suspension parts when he was building a track car... :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes it is. I was telling a colleague about this only the other night.

Several years ago a mate worked for Stanley making prototype tools. They had what he described as several large bathtub type containers, filled with various grades of media. He could throw a rough cast part in at one end, then gradually move it down the finer grades to get a mirror finished end product.

He found it very useful for suspension parts when he was building a track car... :D
Sounds awesome:argie:
 

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The process In the video (called rumbling, or used to be) has been around for years. It's mainly used in component manufacture to take the sharp edges of machined components. It looks like they have refined the process to finish the components. As the video progresses the little cones (porcelain I believe) reduce in size the better the finish. The components we used to pit through would take approx 30mins. I would guess to get the wheels to that quality finish would take a long time. A lot less fannying about than hand polishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was told about 10 hours per wheel, as the cost reflects, but a couple of coats of lacquer over the top (to help my swirl hating problem :rolleyes:)
Quite long, but then again this industry is just in the beginning i believe. Electropolishing could be quicker and better last step shine maker, but a big invest for company. Interesting to see how this business is going to grow.

Lacquer is a must not just because swirls, but also due to oxidation problems that comes with aluminium:thumb:
 

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The company I use do normal returns but do quite a few for bentleys, Porsches etc. due to being in Sevenoaks in Kent they do it all for local dealers (& the odd little VXR :lol:)
 

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That's interesting. I have seen probably slightly better finishes with more traditional methods, but it is a lot of work.

Only point I would add is that a mirror polished aluminium wheel is a nightmare to maintain, and really only suitable on a dry use show car.

Using laquer is an option, but it doesn't always bond well, and detracts from the polished finish anyway, imho.

If you want a bling wheel like this, then chrome plating is the way to go... but that's not cheap either and very few people do it to an aluminium substrate....
 

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I'd never lacquer polished wheels.
as soon as you get a chip (which you will) it will go all milky and terrible.
Polish them twice a year by hand and use a ceramic sealant topped with a decent wax.
No worries.

and yes I run polished dishes.
 
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